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A Brief History of Arahura Farms

A Brief History of Arahura Farms

Arahura Farms provide us with a variety of Certified Organic vegetables.

“Food for living, nutrition for life”

Arahura Farms is strategically located in Nyah, Northern Victoria. Because of the superb climate and soils they are able to grow organic carrot and beetroot all year round, and grow organic onion, lettuce and cabbage seasonally. Their flagship product is their organic carrots with a reputation as being the “sweetest, tastiest carrots on the market”.

Arahura, meaning “path to discovery”, is a family run farm under the leadership of Tony Croft with the support of his family. Arahura Farms were established as Certified Organic in 2000 with the belief that if you take care of the soil in a sustainable way and don’t interfere with the natural makeup of the vegetables, you grow healthy and nutritious produce. Because of this, they don’t brush their vegetables; helping to preserve the outer layer of the skin and enhance the nutritional quality.

The history of how Arahura Farms came to be is certainly a fascinating one. The farm wasn’t always named Arahura and they weren’t always a vegetable producer. The business started as a sheep property in New Zealand, owned by Tony’s parents. In the early 70’s the family moved to Australia (Tresco, Victoria) switching to a horticulture farm. In 2000 after living in the suburbs for a decade and establishing an irrigation design company, Tony and his wife Jennie decided to return to the land to produce chemical free food. This is when “Arahura Farms” was born. They bought the farm in Nyah which started as a 60 acre vineyard. They switched to organic carrots in 2003 and from there gradually became the Arahura Farms known today.

Now with their eldest son, Sean, being part of the business, Arahura Farms has grown to be one of Australia’s largest organic producers. It is now a 220 acre farm and employs over 65 permanent and casual staff. They are passionate about certified organic, sustainable farming practices and “bringing flavour to the table”.